#daddyskill #2, Burping

#​d​addyskill​ #2 Burping: burping the baby after a feeding is a great time to practice your hand drumming. #​k​eepittight​

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This seems goofy, but honestly there is a point aside from being silly and bettering your sense of rhythm. Certain cultures and ethnicities are stereotyped as producing people with rhythm. It’s my opinion that the race of an individual doesn’t determine whether or not they will be musical or have a natural sense of rhythm. Rather, it is the rhythm inherent in the culture they grow up in that influences this. Marcus Miller, the jazz bassist, has some great thoughts about this in his FAQ on his website (www.marcusmiller.com), check it out.

So burping in rhythm is my tiny little first step towards giving my daughter the gift of rhythm (as best I can).

Here are four songs with distinctive drum part to test your mad skills, and have all the other parents look at you like you are crazy.

1. YYZ by Rush

2. Palm Grease by Herbie Hancock

3. Unluck by James Blake

4. I’m gonna fight by William Stonewall Monroe

That last one may be a little self serving, but it does have a great straight burp able rhythm throughout.

What songs would you add to the list?

William Stonewall Monroe

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You make me happy

Here are the lyrics for my new song, “you make me happy.” The chords are G, B, C throughout.

You make me happy,
Not because anything
That you say or do
And if it’s quite alright
I’d like to stay for a while, with you

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My toes don’t much, mind the cold
But your feet next to mine, have such a hold
My hair don’t much mind growing old
But as long as your here, my heart’s growing bolder
To tell you always and tell you all the ways and tell you all your days

You make me happy,
Not because anything
That you say or do
And if it’s quite alright
I’d like to stay for a while, with you

Remember the time you smiled and said, “I got devices”
My pride was still sore, from falling on the ices,
You held my hand and helped me through the crisis
But my mouth was still burnin, cause your so good with spices
To tell you always and tell you all the ways and tell you all your days

You make me happy,
Not because anything
That you say or do
And if it’s quite alright
I’d like to stay for a while, with you

Yo Yo Ma’s brilliant entry

My wife and I went to go see Yo Yo Ma (courtesy of my Uncle) this past weekend. When he walked on stage, he was not carrying his cello. At first we were concerned and slightly confused, but then, he explained.

“I will be your waiter this evening…”

He explained that he saw himself as a waiter, a servant, of the music and of his audience. Likening himself to a a waiter for a Top Chef, he described his role as not creating, but rather presenting a musical experience created by the most expert creators.

pile of homemade pasta, just rolled and cut
pile of homemade pasta, just rolled and cut by cafemama, on Flickr

Now before his show, I had already started thinking of myself (especially where music is concerned) in terms of being a home chef. I even had written the following journal entry

Homemade music

like a homemade pie,
delicious and fresh
lacking entirely straight,
drawn within the lines kind of perfection
floured countertops,
fresh cut fruits
happy accidents,
intentional brilliance
love you can taste.

No stickers to tear.
No boxes to open.
Ingredients you can pronounce.

Close your eyes.
Enjoy every morsel.

After Mr. Ma’s show, the thought finished connecting. While I do compose, I feel my music is a bit more earthy and homey than a lot of classical music.

I am a home cook. Let me bring you emotions and my messages in the freshest way possible. Yo Yo Ma’s entry helped me remember what I want to do with my music as well as set the stage for his own performance. What a great entry and a great night.

William Stonewall Monroe

Slow dancing in a Burning Room

So, I’m not a John Mayer fanboy. But I heard this today and I was impressed. If nothing else, with this one line,

“Slow dancing in a burning room”

In one line, he describes a deeply connected relationship that is headed for disaster.

Slow dancing. It implies care, it implies romance. Slow dancing implies forgetting the world around you. Focus.

And if the heat of the relationship wasn’t enough…

Burning room. It implies destruction through irresistible heat. Power.

He is also quite good on the guitar…William Stonewall Monroe